Blog

Walter Rane's Renaissance

Posted by Micah Christensen on

Walter Rane's Renaissance

Walter Rane is experiencing a Renaissance. We have the privilege of exhibiting several works that show a range — from figurative to landscape and more abstract — that may surprise and delight even his most ardent admirers. Known for works that have been the mainstay of LDS Church publications and buildings for decades, Rane has recently won a prestigious international award from the New-York-based Art Renewal Center (ARC). The panel, composed of artists, museum curators, and publishers gave top prizes to Rane’s works Atmosphere (2016) and Floating Figures (2016), which were subsequently exhibited at the Salmagundi Club (New York) and...

Read more →

Norman Rockwell's Samson

Posted by Eric Biggart on

Norman Rockwell's Samson

In 1947, Norman Rockwell was approached by Cecil B. DeMille to help conceptualize the most dramatic and meaningful moments of what would become one of the most successful films of all time. Concerned with making something with gravitas, DeMille insisted that Rockwell, step outside of his aesthetic of everyday genre scenes that had made him famous, look to  Old Master depictions of the subject. The work became a central plank in Rockwell’s ambitions to create an academy of art, and be seen as a serious figurative artist.   About the Commission John Bainbridge. “Samson and Delilah and DeMille: The masters...

Read more →

The Nativity by Carl Bloch

Posted by Eric Biggart on

The Nativity by Carl Bloch

Carl Bloch is regarded in many circles as one of the great depicters of religious art of the 19th Century. His work has seen a resurgence of popularity, in Utah in particular thanks to exhibitions at the BYU Museum of Art and works borrowed from collections in New York and Bloch's native Denmark. But not all of his works are so grandiose. Bloch was a respected engraver and illustrator and did dozens of humble scenes depicting stories from the Bible. This piece is particularly appropriate as we approach the Christmas season. Bloch's depiction of The Nativity is both humble and luminary. This...

Read more →

Vanishing Landscapes: New Paintings by Bryan Mark Taylor

Posted by Micah Christensen on

Vanishing Landscapes: New Paintings by Bryan Mark Taylor

Vanishing Landscapes, an exhibition of Bryan Mark Taylor’s most recent works from China, will be on view at Anthony’s Fine Art (401 East 200 South, Salt Lake City) from December 1 to January 20. 
Opening night | December 1, 6-9 PM 7 PM demonstration by Bryan Mark Taylor

Read more →

Two Masterworks by Cornelis Kruseman, "Raphael of the North," Rediscovered

Posted by Eric Biggart on

Two Masterworks by Cornelis Kruseman, "Raphael of the North," Rediscovered

Known to contemporaries as the “Raphael of the North,” Cornelis Kruseman (1797-1858) was considered the greatest Dutch painter of the first half of the nineteenth-century. His most important commission was four monumental paintings entitled Christ Blessing the Children (1853) Christ in the House of Mary and Martha (1854), Christ Carrying the Cross (1851) and Christ Bewailed by the Women of Jerusalem. Until 1913, all four paintings were hung together at Castle Zeist, located outside the city Utrecht, which was home of the Moravian Church in the Netherlands. But, the works were separated and lost with the exception of one, The Lamentation, now located in the Rijksmuseum (Amsterdam); where it is the only example of Kruseman’s work in the museum’s collection of religious Romantic painting.

Read more →